Chemical dating in archaeology

Relative dating in archaeology presumes the age of an artefact in relation and by comparison, to other objects found in its vicinity.Limits to relative dating are that it cannot provide an accurate year or a specific date of use.b) Absolute These methods are based on calculating the date of artefacts in a more precise way using different attributes of materials.

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The first method was based on radioactive elements whose property of decay occurs at a constant rate, known as the half-life of the isotope.The style of the artefact and its archaeology location stratigraphically are required to arrive at a relative date.For example, if an artefact, say an oil lamp, is found co-located on the same floor of a governor's dwelling, and that floor can be dated in archaeology terms by reason of the patterns employed in the mosaic, then it is assumed that in relation to the floor that the lamp is of the same age.Today, many different radioactive elements have been used, but the most famous absolute dating method is radiocarbon dating, which uses the isotope C.This isotope, which can be found in organic materials and can be used only to date organic materials, has been incorrectly used by many to make dating assumptions for non-organic material such as stone buildings.